Subscriber-Only Content; You must be a PW subscriber to access the backissue database. PW has integrated its print and digital subscriptions, offering exciting new benefits to subscribers, who are now entitled to both the print edition and the digital edition via our app or online. For more information on PW's new integrated subscription plan, click here. If you are currently a PW subscriber, click "Login" for full access to the site (if you have not done so already, you will need to set up your account for the new system by going here), or click the "Subscribe" button to become a PW subscriber. Email service@publishersweekly.com with questions.

Login or Subscribe
The Match Girl and the Heiress

Seth Koven. Princeton Univ, $35 (480p) ISBN 978-0-691-15850-1

..
Rutgers University historian Koven (Slumming) has fashioned a scholarly yet highly readable jewel that tackles the big issues of early-20th-century England in an intimate way. Through the lives of Muriel Lester and Nellie Dowell, he brilliantly illuminates the growth of global capitalism, a revolutionary “God is love” Christian theology, war and pacifism, feminism and sexuality, and class and gender relations. Lester grew up in comfort, the beloved daughter of a self-made man who amassed a fortune in shipbuilding and took his Christian obligations seriously. Dowell, no less a beloved daughter, was born into a working-class family that was doing well until her father, a mariner, died at sea. In Dickensian fashion, the Dowells slipped further down the economic ladder, until Nellie was taken away to an industrial school to prepare her for a life of factory work. Meanwhile, Lester played with dolls and received an education, which led her into social justice projects. Dowell took a job in a match factory, joined the Factory Girls Club, and happened to meet Muriel. They forged an intimate friendship and partnership, “engaged in social, religious, and political work.” Against the socio-economic complexities of the Victorian Era, Koven astutely shows how the pair “strove to make themselves—and modern life—moral.” Illus. (Jan.)

Reviewed on 11/14/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Small-Space Vegetable Gardens: Growing Great Edibles in Containers, Raised Beds, and Small Plots

Andrea Bellamy. Timber, $19.95 trade paper (232p) ISBN 978-1-60469-547-2

..
This handy volume dispels the notion that raised-bed gardens and container gardening are for amateurs. To the contrary, Bellamy (Sugar Snaps and Strawberries) makes the case that small-scale gardening offers the opportunity to experience the fullness of horticultural possibility in defined and proportionate spaces. Through charts, illustrations, and to-do lists, she demonstrates that container gardens are just the right size to be manageable and to explore the entire cycle of gardening, from seed to harvest. Beginning with the rudimentary aspects of the nature of soil, the usefulness of mulch, and the making of compost, she explains the unique conditions for starting seeds and, later, for plant maintenance, including guidelines about watering. From there, post-harvest, the section on saving and storing seeds and propagating can encourage the gardener to keep the garden going perpetually. Finally, at season’s end, when all is harvested and seeds stored, the section on winter protection and cleaning tools brings the process full circle. Bellamy has written an inspiring and practical guide to sprouting life in the nooks and corners of unused land. (Dec.)

Reviewed on 11/14/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
This is Mouse: An Adventure in Sewing

Brenna Maloney. C&T/Funstitch, $21.95 paper (112p) ISBN 978-1-60705-977-6

..
With two previous sewing books (Socks Appeal and Sock It to Me!) under her belt, Maloney is well-positioned to create a worthwhile book on sewing for kids. Her effort is as charming as can be, combining clear instructions and adorable patterns with a series of stories about the titular protagonist. The book begins with a winning and short overview of sewing skills: “My editors tell me that it’s very important that I teach you the proper words for things,” she writes. Then readers will learn how to make Mouse as well as a cast of other characters (snakes, penguins, aliens) who appear in a jungle, at the North Pole, and in space. While the instructions are shown in step-by-step photos, the projects still might require an adult’s help. Maloney has cleverly designed projects that can be hand or machine-sewn, and that appear to be accessible to beginners. She notes at the beginning that the editors have allowed her to “write the books I always wanted to read.” She’s not alone; many other young sewists will want to read this one, too. Photographs, pattern pullouts. (Dec.)

Reviewed on 11/14/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Shades of Light: Making Tailored Lampshades

Ruth De Fraga Gomes. Robert Hale (Trafalgar Square, dist.), $27.95 (176p) ISBN 978-0-7198-1105-0

..
Gomes is an expert on making lamp shades, a “craft that has enabled me to develop my interest in fabric, color, design, trim, and embellishment.” In this reference book, she distills her 15 years of experience into a concise guide to the craft, as well as an overview of the surprisingly interesting history of lamp shades. The topic may seem unpromising, but by the time reader gets to chapter 18 (on fan pleating a shade) or chapter 23 (on kitchen shades) this misapprehension will be put to rest. Every kind of shade is presented, along with details and sketches to make the ways of creation clear. Gomes’s work leans toward the feminine end of the spectrum, but a variety of lamp shades are shown in photographs. The book, however, is British and the measurements are in the metric system, which can prove tricky. But perhaps the bigger question is whether there is a market for a nearly thirty-dollar book on lamp shades? (Jan.)

Reviewed on 11/14/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Double Wedding Ring Quilts: Traditions Made Modern

Victoria Findlay Wolfe. C&T, $24.95 paper (112p) ISBN 978-1-61745-026-6

..
Although boasting a fine-arts degree, Wolfe (15 Minutes of Play) writes accessibly about her double wedding ring quilts as if she’s jotting bread-and-butter letters. Her words are warm and nostalgic as she remembers arriving in New York City with $200 to her name after practically running from the Minnesota farm of her girlhood. But she found that she never quite left that farm behind, for her quilting grandmother becomes her inspiration. “Everything started with this quilt,” she says of “Double Edged Love,” a best-of-show winner at the first national conference of the Modern Quilt Guild. Embedded within her breezy reminiscences are solid suggestions for 10 projects: besides “Don’t sweat the small stuff,” Wolfe offers fabric requirements and cutting instructions for the melons and arcs, as she names parts of the wedding ring pattern, and also additional creative possibilities, laid out like yardage; hints for development of craft; and a list of “ideas carried over” from quilt to quilt. Wolfe is boldly mining her heritage. (Jan.)

Reviewed on 11/14/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
30 Lessons for Loving: Advice from the Wisest Americans on Love, Relationships, and Marriage

Karl Pillemer. Penguin/Hudson Street, $25.95 (304p) ISBN 978-1-59463-154-2

..
Gerontologist Pillemer shares findings from his survey of 700 people in “very long marriages” (the shortest here have lasted three decades, the longest, more than five) for tips on maintaining successful long-term relationships. The respondents, charmingly called “the experts” by Pillemer, share “storehouses of invaluable lived experience” on areas including questions to ask yourself before settling down, domestic violence, and late-in-life sex. Communication is discussed at length via six lessons, including being polite to your partner within “the comfortable informality of married life” and choosing the appropriate time for serious conversations. The experts break down conflict by examining the “five major stressors” that affect most relationships, with rules for dealing with the in-laws and properly delegating household labor. In addition to summarizing his survey’s results, Pillemer shares the experts’ own words. One respondent describes divorcing her husband and remarrying him 64 years later, while an 88-year-old “rough and tumble” Korean War veteran suggests taking an interest in your partner’s preferred activities, remarking, “I went to operas. Operas!” The benefits of such a comprehensive study incorporating so many years of experience should be ample, for newlyweds and contemporaries of the respondents alike. The advice is astute, fresh, and well selected by Pillemer. This book would serve as an excellent gift for newlyweds. (Jan.)

Reviewed on 11/14/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Yoga for Cancer: A Guide to Managing Side Effects, Boosting Immunity, and Improving Recovery for Cancer Survivors

Tari Prinster. Inner Traditions/Healing Arts Press, $19.95 (320p) ISBN 978-1-62055-272-8

..
Prinster, a breast cancer survivor and certified yoga teacher, presents an innovative plan to help readers diagnosed with cancer reap the benefits of yoga practice, from diagnosis through recovery. Admitting she was initially skeptical of yoga’s “healing powers,” Prinster takes readers through the scientific research, concluding that yoga can function as the “organ muscle” of the lymphatic system: helping with lymphatic drainage, venous return, bone building, relaxation, and immune function. Prinster also persuasively demonstrates how yoga can cleanse and strengthen the body, increase range of motion and flexibility, strengthen the spine, alleviate weight gain, and help patients deal with pain, fear, and anxiety. To meet the particular needs of cancer patients, the book presents 53 different poses, appropriate for different diagnoses or stages of treatment. Although Prinster notes the advantages of taking a group yoga class, this text will help readers build their own home practice (particularly useful for those who can’t locate a survivor class or would like to supplement one). In clear, compassionate language, Prinster explains her methodology and eloquently argues for yoga as a “prescription for reclaiming life and as a wellness plan for moving on to long-term health.” (Dec.)

Reviewed on 11/14/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Passionate Nutrition: A Guide to Using Food as Medicine from a Nutritionist Who Healed Herself from the Inside Out

Jennifer Adler, with Jess Thomson. Sasquatch, $23.95 (288p) ISBN 978-157061-945-8

..
Certified nutritionist and first-time author Adler serves up a pragmatic and sustainable guide to the healing power of good food. After a childhood marked by poverty and neglect, Adler found herself in early adulthood with a laundry list of physical and emotional ills. She began an intense study of nutrition and global diets, leading her to the belief that we should approach “food as medicine.” That credo is the bedrock of her simple approach, which emphasizes whole and fermented foods (the latter to promote a healthy gut); protein to crush sugar cravings; and whole fats for bone health, immunity, and satiety. Also included are a discussion of the link between good nutrition and good sex, an analysis of the emotional demons that lead to negative food choices, and 24 pages of recipes. Adler’s book is an essential healthy living primer that’s equal parts no-holds-barred memoir and low-key self-help tome, and a vital resource for anyone who wants to live a healthier, more empowered life. (Dec.)

Reviewed on 11/14/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
How to Win at Shopping: 297 Insider Secrets for Getting the Look You Want

David Zyla and Eila Mell. Workman, $12.95 trade paper (192 pages) ISBN 978-0-7611-8382-2

..
This friendly, pocket-size guide is geared at people who don’t put any thought into clothes shopping and have a closet full of unworn things. Chatty in tone, this brisk manual advises readers on how to shop successfully for items that fit—and fit in with the rest of your wardrobe. First, the authors, stylist Zyla and fashion writer Mell, suggest shopping your closet as if you are picking out costumes for a film you’re starring in: “Ask yourself what [your clothes] say about your ‘character,’ then make sure that all future purchases connect with and illustrate that vision.” Chapters explain how to navigate department stores and retail outlets, when to get tailors involved, and how to shop online. The guide lists 10 wardrobe staples that not all readers will agree with. The most helpful sections are the most specific: “How to Shop for a Job Interview,” “How to Shop for a Date,” and “What Hue are You?” For readers who love clothes but dread buying them, Zyla and Mell offer the keys to a dynamic wardrobe. . (Feb.)

Reviewed on 11/14/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Teenage Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Survival Guide to Raising Adolescents and Young Adults

Frances E. Jensen, with Amy Ellis Nutt. Harper, $27.99 (384p) ISBN 978-0-06-206784-5

..
When pediatric neurologist Jensen’s sons began exhibiting typical teenage behavior—impulsivity, risk-taking, slipping grades, and mood swings—her professional training prompted her to wonder not only “What were they thinking?” but “How were they thinking?” This well-written, accessible work surveys recent research into the adolescent brain, a subject relatively unexplored until just this past decade. The result illuminates the specific ways in which the teen brain differs from that of a child or an adult. As Jensen explains, while hormones cause some changes, teen behavior—even through the college years—is most influenced by the connections between brain areas still under development, including new brain circuitry, chemicals, and neurotransmitters. This period of growth increases both adolescents’ capacity for remarkable accomplishments and their vulnerability to stress, drugs, sleep deficit, and environmental changes. Chapter by chapter, Jensen covers essential topics: how teens learn; why they need more sleep; coping with stress; mental illness; the “digital invasion of the teenage brain”; and the biological differences between girls’ and boys’ brains. Speaking as one parent to another, she offers support and a way for parents to understand and relate to their own soon-to-be-adult offspring. Agent: Wendy Strothman. (Jan.)

Reviewed on 11/14/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
X
Stay ahead with
Tip Sheet!
Free newsletter: the hottest new books, features and more
X
X
X
Email Address

Password

Log In Lost Password

PW has integrated its print and digital subscriptions, offering exciting new benefits to subscribers, who are now entitled to both the print edition and the digital editions of PW (online or via our app). For instructions on how to set up your accout for digital access, click here. For more information, click here.

The part of the site you are trying to access is now available to subscribers only. Subscribers: to set up your digital subscription with the new system (if you have not done so already), click here. To subscribe, click here.

Email pw@pubservice.com with questions.

Not Registered? Click here.